Summer Block & Melissa Chadburn: New Guest Instructors for Fall!

Before we release our schedule on Wednesday, we'd like to announce that we have two new talented guest instructors for the fall! Melissa Chadburn will be teaching our Nonfiction I workshop in Atwater Village and Summer Block will be teaching Essay Writing in Burbank (both on Wednesday evenings starting the third week of October). Read below for more information on these fine writers and please welcome them to WWLA!


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Summer Block has contributed essays, short fiction, and poetry to The Toast, The Awl, The Rumpus, Catapult, The Nervous Breakdown, McSweeney's, and PANK, and many other places. Her work has been featured in several anthologies, most recently California Prose Directory: New Writing from the Golden State. She is currently working on a book about occult communities in the San Fernando Valley.


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Melissa Chadburn has written for The Atlantic's Citylab, Buzzfeed, Poets & Writers, Salon, American Public Media’s Marketplace, Al Jazeera America, and dozens of other places. She is a fellow for The Economic Hardship Reporting Project. Her essay, “The Throwaways,” received notable mention in Best American Essays and Best American Nonrequired Reading. Her debut novel, A Tiny Upward Shove, is forthcoming with Farrar, Straus, & Giroux. 

Summer 2017 News

Neelanjana Banerjee (Organizing Your Writing with Scrivener) spoke with Mira Nair about turning Monsoon Wedding into a theatrical musical, first stop Berkeley Rep, for the Center for Asian American Media.

Katie Barnes was accepted to the Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference in August to participate in the nonfiction workshop.

The Thorn Necklace (Seal Press), a writing guide/memoir by Francesca Lia Block (Memoir 101: From Purge to Pitch), will be available in spring 2018. Francesca is currently at work on a novel.

“The Tunnel of Love,” a story by Chris Daley (The Art of the Short Story; Nonfiction III), was published by Cease, Cows.

Pithead Chapel published “Canopy,” a new story by Christopher DeWan (Fiction I). His story “The Atheist of Dekalb Street” was also included in Best Small Fictions 2017, edited by Amy Hempel and published by Braddock Avenue Books.

Dawn Dorland appeared at BinderCon (April 1-2, UCLA) on a panel about writing and class called "On Payment" and taught two nonfiction seminars at the Muse & the Marketplace conference (May 5-7, Boston). On the merit of her novel-in-progress Econoline, Dawn will attend the 2017 Tin House Summer Workshops (July 9-16, Portland).

Wendy Fontaine’s essay “Angie & Betty & Me” appeared in Compose: A Journal of Simply Good Writing.

Cease, Cows also published “Living Rooms,” a story by Laroo Jack.

Edan Lepucki's new novel, Woman No. 17, came out on May 9th. Her essay "Our Mothers as We Never Saw Them" was published on The New York Times Opinion page, and her profile of Kevin Bacon can be found in the most recent issue of Esquire Magazine.

Elline Lipkin (Poetry II) served as co-editor of the Altadena Poetry Review, which launched in late April and included poems by Robin Ford and Annette Wong. Elline has recently been awarded a California Writing Residency through 1888 + Yefe Nof in San Bernardino, CA. She also blogged for Poets & Writers about the wonderful poetry workshop that Suzanne Lummis led back in February of this year.

Kate Maruyama’s short story, "La Calavera," about cultural appropriation gone sideways, will be appearing in Cemetery Dance's anthology, Halloween Carnival, coming out from Random House this fall. She also reflected on 2014’s 90x90 events in anticipation of their return this summer.

“Golden State," a story by Scott O’Connor (Novel I) is now part of Amazon's new Prime Reading service, so Prime members can read it for free.

Brevity published Kate Martin Rowe’s essay “Summer Missionary.”

Joyce Salter will attend “Dreaming Awake: A Generative Fiction Writing Workshop” with Dan Chaon at The Port Townsend Writing Conference in July.

Margaret Wappler wrote the cover story on Kerry Washington for Net-A-Porter.

Lydia Whitlock’s essay “I thought I was over my relationship—but then I did my taxes” was published by The Washington Post.

Annette Wong read at LitFest Pasadena on the panel "10 Distinguished Local Poets" and was accepted to the Squaw Valley Writers' Conference.

Jules Wood will be joining the University of Iowa MFA program for poetry this fall.

Summer Guest Instructors Galore!

We're really excited to have three talented writers joining us as guest instructors on our summer roster (which will go live on Wednesday!). Whether you write fiction, memoir, or nonfiction, these authors will inspire new writing and help develop your works in progress.

Welcome Lilliam Rivera, Zan Romanoff, and Elizabeth L. Silver! 


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Lilliam Rivera is an award-winning writer and author of The Education of Margot Sanchez, a contemporary young adult novel available now from Simon & Schuster. Recently named a "2017 Face to Watch" by the Los Angeles Times, Lilliam's work has appeared in Tin House, Los Angeles Times, and Latina, to name a few. She lives in Los Angeles where she’s completing her second novel.



Zan Romanoff is the author of two young adult novels, A Song to Take the World Apart and Grace and the Fever, both with Knopf Books for Young Readers. Her nonfiction has appeared online and in print in Allure, Buzzfeed, Elle, GQ, Lucky Peach, The New Republic, and The Paris Review Daily. She was born and raised in Los Angeles. 


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Elizabeth L Silver is the author of the memoir, The Tincture of Time: A Memoir of (Medical) Uncertainty (Penguin Press, 2017) and the critically acclaimed novel, The Execution of Noa P. Singleton (Crown, 2013), which was the Amazon Best Debut of the Month, an Amazon Best Book of the Year, Kirkus Best Book of the Summer, and published in seven languages. Elizabeth’s writing has appeared in or is forthcoming from McSweeney’sLenny Letter, New York Magazine, Literary Hub, The RumpusThe Los Angeles ReviewThe Millions, and The Dallas Morning News, among others. A graduate of the University of Pennsylvania, the MA program in Creative Writing from the University of East Anglia in England, and Temple University Beasley School of Law, Elizabeth lives with her family in Los Angeles.



Stay tuned for more details!

Spring 2017 News

Writing Workshops Los Angeles is proud to be a community partner with Lambda LitFest, a free, weeklong literary festival that celebrates and honors and expands on the rich, diverse tradition of LGBTQ writers and readers in the Southland. Starting March 6!

“How to Love Los Angeles,” an essay by Chris Daley (Essay Writing; Fiction I), was published in the “Time, time, time...” issue of Angels Flight • literary west. She will be reading the essay at the AFLW Salon at Clifton’s Republic on March 26. Three photos from her “Hanging Bear” series will be featured in the next issue of Print Oriented Bastards. She is also now designing author websites through Chris Daley Writing & Design.

Christopher DeWan had a short story called "Visitation" published in Gravel in February, and "The Signal" will appear in Bodega later this spring. 

The Iowa Review will soon publish Jennifer Alise Drew’s essay “Personal Matters.”

“Coyote in the Blood,” a chapter from the novel in progress by Seth Fischer (Make America Write Again; Memoir I), will be published by Joyland in May.

Amy Forstadt’s poem “After the Election” appeared in Anti-Heroin Chic, and her poem “What My Son Learns” was published by Heavy Feather Review.

Ella Martinsen Gorham read at Diesel: A Bookstore in Oakland, CA as part of Zyzzyva Magazine's celebration of their winter issue. Her story is published in the magazine. Guest instructor Scott O'Connor (Getting to the Heart of Your Characters), whose short story also appears in the issue, read as well. 

The Erotic Zookeeper,” a story by Laroo Jack, was published in the fall 2016 issue of Ghostlight: The Magazine of Terror.

Ruth LeFaive’s story “You Got This,” first drafted in Chris DeWan’s mixed levels fiction class, was published in Atticus Review.

Edan Lepucki co-wrote, with poet Tess Taylor, an op-ed in the LA Times about the book club they formed with their 5-year-old sons. She also published the short story "Chorus" in Slate Magazine as part of their series of short stories about life under a Trump regime.

Kate Maruyama (Novel I) is on a short story streak! Her story "The Sound" appeared in Whistling Shade in November, "Fries and Coffee" is in the spring version of The Corvus Review, and her short story "False Spring" will be up on Entropymag.org on March 16th as part of their "On Weather" series.

Compose Journal nominated Anthony Mohr’s essay “Super Summer Spectacular” for a Pushcart Prize. He also has an essay titled "Risk," which he worked on in Bernard Cooper's workshop, coming out in Superstition Review.

Margaret Wappler (Nonfiction I) interviewed Margaret Atwood, one of her heroes, for the Los Angeles Times. The interview will be in next Sunday's paper.

Kim Young’s manuscript, Tigers, was chosen by Ross Gay as a finalist for the Jake Adam York Poetry Prize hosted by Copper Nickel. She also has a new poem forthcoming in TriQuarterly.

Congratulations, WWLA writers!

Winter 2017 News

We're proud of our WWLA writers!

Marie Condron wrote a profile of Hartley Burr Alexander Chair of Humanities Myriam J. A. Chancy for Scripps Magazine.

Forth Magazine will publish “Most Bones Get Buried,” an essay by Chris Daley (Nonfiction II), alongside her photograph “Ballin Ceiling Mural.” 

Christopher DeWan (Experimental Fiction) will be a featured author at Stories on Stage Davis this December, alongside Ramona Ausubel. Also in December, his short story "The Signal" will appear in Sick Lit Magazine.

In addition to being nominated for the National Book Critics Circle Award, Kirkus Reviews named Grace, the debut novel from Natashia Deón (Navigating Personal Faith in Your Writing), one of the year’s best books, and The New York Times included it in their 2016 Holiday Gift Guide. Natashia, “the hardest-working debut novelist in Los Angles,” was also profiled in the Los Angeles Times.

Natashia Deón (Grace) and Margaret Wappler (Neon Green) were both listed on Entropy’s Best Fiction Books of 2016.

Dawn Dorland was a finalist for the 2017 Annenberg Community Beach House Writing Residency in Santa Monica and has been waitlisted for a 2017 Djerassi Artist's Residency. She was recently named a Teaching Scholar for the 2017 Muse & the Marketplace conference, held annually by GrubStreet in Boston, where she will teach nonfiction. 

“Emergence,” an essay by Jennifer Alise Drew, will appear in the Corporeal issue (#20) of Slice Magazine, which comes out in March.

Seth Fischer (Essay Writing; Fiction I) is joining Angels Flight • literary west as their new nonfiction editor. They are currently accepting submissions for the upcoming Resistance issue. Seth also attended the Bisexual Community Briefing at The White House in September. He wrote about the experience at the Antioch University website.

Terrance Flynn was a chief contributor to The Wall Street Journal’s feature “101 Rut-Busting Things to Do This Weekend” published on October 27.

Anita Gill’s “An Open Letter to My College Student Frantically Trying to Complete Last Week’s Homework During Class” appeared in Defenestration Magazine in September. In October, McSweeney’s posted her piece “Full Disclosure Form for Fiction Writing Workshop Submission.”

Marnie Goodfriend signed with Ryan D. Harbage at The Fischer-Harbage Agency.

Zyzzyva’s Winter 2016 issue will include Ella Martinsen Gorham’s story "The Urban Forest."

DeLon Howell’s essay “Woke” will be published in the Winter 2016 issue of The Stonecoast Review.

Edan Lepucki wrote about her favorite J. Crew jacket for New York Magazine’s The Cut. She also interviewed Margot Livesey at The Millions.

Kate Maruyama (Fiction II; Re-Vision: An Inside Out Novel Revision Seminar) had a story in the fall issue of Whistling Shade and her story "Supercuts" appeared in Duende.

Anthony Mohr’s essay "Rainy Day Schedule," which originally ran in DIAGRAM, will be reprinted in the 2017 edition of the California Prose Directory.

Sirens, a memoir by Joshua Mohr (The Dueling 'I's in Memoir), will be published by Two Dollar Radio on January 10, 2017. Jerry Stahl described the memoir as “astonishing, heart-in-the-mouth, darkly funny, and wildly inspiring.”

Wonder Valley, the third novel by Ivy Pochoda (Essay Writing), will be published by Ecco / HarperCollins in Fall 2017.

A radio story written and produced by Jessica Ripka, "Now There's Only Time To Live Forever," was picked up by the Remix podcast.

Stephanie Ross’s essay “Consciousness Raising” will appear in the forthcoming anthology My Body/My Words.

Matthew Sosnow was accepted to a number of MFA programs for fiction writing, and he will attend Bennington's low-residency program.

Diana Wagman (Novel II) and her daughter are traveling to England to visit Jane Austen's birthplace, her home in Bath, her publisher's office, her plaque in Westminster Abbey, and other Austen-centric locations.

Margaret Wappler (Memoir I; Novel I) wrote an essay on silence for California Sunday Magazine's special Sound issue in September. She was also a conference panelist at “Science Fiction L.A.: Words and World Building in the City of Angels” at the University of Southern California in October.

Kim Young (Putting Together a Poetry Chapbook) has been recognized with an award from California State University, Northridge for her excellence in teaching. Kim’s poem “The Felons” was published by [PANK] in October. She also has new poems in the latest issues of Strutco and Hotel Amerika. The Cincinnati Review awarded her poem “Tiger” an honorable mention for the Robert and Adele Schiff Poetry Award. 

Fall 2016 News

Congratulations to all the WWLA writers with good news this term!

Leslie Cook’
s poetry was published in the “Love and Ensuing Madness” section of Rat's Ass Review.

Warner Brothers has bought the rights to Bernard Cooper’s memoir The Bill from My Father for the second time since the book was published in 2006. 

Chris Daley’s submission “Heavenly” received an honorable mention in the Literary Death Match 250-Word Bookmark Contest judged by Daniel Handler. She also recently completed the redesign of this website.

Christopher DeWan’s story collection Hoopty Time Machines (Atticus Books) will be published on September 22! You can attend launch events at Skylight Books on September 21 and The Last Bookstore on September 27. Chris’s stories also recently appeared in Cease Cows, the Electronic Encyclopedia of Experimental Literature, Hobart, and Passages North.

An excerpt of Dawn Dorland's novel-in-progress Econoline won third place in the Writers at Work 2016 Emerging Writer Contest, judged by Peter Ho Davies. Dawn was also in residence for one month this summer at the Ragdale Foundation in Lake Forest, Illinois.

Members of Chris Daley’s Memoir Manuscript Intensive Workshop—Jennifer Alise Drew, Christy Ellis, Terrance Flynn, Karen Lentz, Stephanie Ross, Joyce Salter, and Megan Stephan—read from their work at the Bar Covell Sidebar on July 15.

Seth Fischer’s short story “Our Most Frequent Requests” will appear in a forthcoming issue of Gargoyle Magazine, and his The Rumpus essay "Bow and Arrow" was chosen for the 2017 California Prose Directory, edited by Lisa Locascio. Seth will be reading as part of the Roar Shack reading series (with our fall guest instructor Natashia Deón) on September 11, and he’ll read from Rich Ferguson's book New Jersey Me (which Seth edited) at Chevalier’s Books on September 15.

Amy Forstadt's short story "Winter in Chicago" and Marnie Goodfriend’s essay “Stronger Than Magic” were published by Entropy.

Gulf Coast: A Journal of Literature and Fine Arts published Nicole Hoelle’s essay “Rick Has Died.”

Edan Lepucki reviewed Losing It by Emma Rathbone for The San Francisco Chronicle. Her essay "My California" was published in Zócalo Public Square. The cover of Edan's second novel, Woman No. 17, was revealed on The Millions.

Elline Lipkin was a writer in residence at Dorland Mountain Arts Colony in July. Her poem “Catholic Boarding School, Six Years Old, 1943“ will appear in a future issue of Calyx. In June, she participated on a panel about poet laureates at LitFest Pasadena. Elline was also a featured reader in the Village Poets of Sunland–Tujunga series this past Sunday, August 28, and she has been invited to participate in the Tabula Poetica Reading Series at Chapman University in December.

Wendy Moss was invited to participate in the Southampton Writers' Conference this July based on the strength of an essay that she wrote and workshopped in Dawn Dorland's Mixed Levels Nonfiction class.

This fall, Jessica Ripka will be training as a radio producer at the Transom Story Workshop on Cape Cod in Massachusetts.

Sally Stevens had two more stories appear in the No Extra Words podcast: “Wrong Number” in June and “Jasper” in July.

Laura Warrell attended the Tin House Summer Writers’ Workshop in July.

This fall, Lauren Westerfield is kicking off her tenure as the nonfiction editor of FUGUE, the literary journal at the University of Idaho. She also was the recipient of a Centrum Fellowship this summer, which sent her to the Port Townsend Writing Conference for a week of workshops and readings in Washington.

Tim Youd typed two John Rechy novels—City of Night at LACE and Numbers at Griffith Park—as part of his 100 Novels Project.