Welcome Two New Instructors

Posted: November 27th, 2013 | Author: | Filed under: Uncategorized | No Comments »

WWLA is delighted to announce that Caeli Widger and Darcy Vebber have joined the teaching staff. Check out their bios below, and look for their classes in the winter 2014 schedule (to be announced in early December).

Caeli Widger earned her MFA from the University of Montana and has taught creative writing at the Sackett Street Writers’ Workshop, University College London, and Johns Hopkins University.  Real Happy Family, her debut novel, is forthcoming from New Harvest/Houghton Mifflin Harcourt in March 2014.  Her work has appeared in such publications as the New York Times MagazineAnother Chicago Magazine, and the Madison Review, as well as on NPR and CBS Radio.  A Florida native, Caeli now lives in Santa Monica with her husband and three children.

Caeli Widger

Darcy Vebber has published fiction in the Iowa Review and the Otis Review and nonfiction in the Village Voice and Parade Magazine. She has a BA in film from USC and worked for many years in film production. After she earned her MFA from Otis College of Art and Design in 2006, she was an assistant to literary agent Betsy Amster, reading submissions and writing delicately-worded rejection letters. She has been a contributor at Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference twice, where she studied with Amy Hempel and Robert Bowsell. Currently she writes about food for the Jewish Journal, and about the intersection of ritual and everyday life for Tribe Magazine. She also teaches writing to young adults at the non-profit Art Division in downtown L.A.  She is finishing a novel.

Darcy Vebber

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Coming Soon: Winter 2014 Classes

Posted: November 12th, 2013 | Author: | Filed under: Uncategorized | No Comments »

Although temperatures in LA show no signs of dipping below 80, the Winter 2014 class schedule is on its way!  Watch this space – it’ll be here soon.

To get first notice of new classes, sign up for our mailing list by clicking here.


Fall 2013 Class Schedule

Posted: August 27th, 2013 | Author: | Filed under: Uncategorized | No Comments »

Here they are, folks, the fall classes.  Please email writingworkshopsls@gmail.com to enroll!

FALL 2013 CLASS SCHEDULE

POETRY

Mixed Levels Poetry Workshop  (with Elline Lipkin in Beverly Grove)

Tuesdays, 7:30 to 9:30 pm
October 8 , 2013 to December 3, 2013 (no class November 26, 2013)

SOLD OUT!

This 8-week class is designed to bring writing students even deeper into their practice of poetry. Each meeting will focus on a different type of contemporary poetry, such as the New York School of Poets, the “confessional,” New Formalism, the gurlesque, or Language poetry.  Students will read published writers whose work exemplifies each movement and then try a series of prompts to better understand the techniques and characteristics of this movement. Each week students will have the chance to read established poets’ work, have a poem reviewed, and offer feedback on each other’s writing. This class is an opportunity for students to explore the traditions of various schools of poetry, and to engage with fellow students in a craft-focused workshop environment.

This course will take place in Beverly Grove where wine and sparkling water—and the occasional gourmet cheese—will be served.

Enrollment limit: 8 students
$400 for new students; $360 for returning students (price includes a parking pass; payment plans available to returning students)

To apply for entry, please email writingworkshopsla@gmail.com.

***

NONFICTION

Using Fiction Techniques in Memoir: 2-Day Seminar (taught by Chris Daley in Los Feliz)

2 Saturdays, 10 am to 1 pm
December 7, 2013 and December 14, 2013

SOLD OUT!

Of all the subgenres in creative nonfiction, memoir can benefit most by incorporating fiction techniques. In fact, thinking of your memoir this way can make your story more relevant to more readers. Developing point of view, character motivation, and narrative voice can help construct an engaging persona to tell your story. Effective plot structure, scene building, and dialogue can add shape and a rhythmic tension to your life events. In this two-day seminar, we will also explore other techniques generally considered to “belong” to fiction, such as the use of subplot, suspense, setting, and figurative language. A few readings will be discussed in the first meeting, and a short writing assignment will be due in the second.

This seminar will take place in Los Feliz where coffee, sparkling water and light snacks will be served.

Enrollment limit: 8 students
$150 for new students; $130 for returning students

If you’re interested in signing up, please email writingworkshopsla@gmail.com

***

Nonfiction I (taught by Margaret Wappler in Mt. Washington)

Thursdays, 7:30 to 9:30 pm
September 26, 2013 to November 21, 2013  (no class 10/10)

SOLD OUT!

In this 8-week course, students will read, discuss, and write essays (or chapters) that will explore the genre(s) of personal narrative and memoir. The readings will be selected to stimulate thinking, exemplify different techniques and styles, and suggest techniques for engaging personal and creative expression. There will be in-class and homework exercises that address topics such as persona, audience, story, description, memory and truth, and ethical considerations specific to the genre. Students will have the chance to workshop their writing in a serious environment meant to challenge and inspire each member of the class.

This course will take place in Mt. Washington, where wine and sparkling water—and the occasional gourmet cheese—will be served.

Enrollment limit: 8 students
Course fee: $380 for new students; $340 for returning students (Payment plans available to returning students)

If you’re interested in signing up, please email writingworkshopsla@gmail.com

***

Nonfiction II (taught by Seth Fischer in Downtown L.A.)

Wednesdays, 7:30 to 9:30 pm
October 2, 2013 to November 20, 2013

3 SPOTS LEFT!

This 8-week intermediate course is designed for writers who are looking to continue their exploration of the memoir or personal essay genre. The students will have some familiarity with at least a few of the generic concerns of personal narrative, such as hybridity of form, dramatization, retrospective versus immediate point of view, ethics, and so on. There will be some assigned readings, but the class will focus on bringing projects toward completion through a process of drafting, feedback, and revision in a challenging but supportive environment. Weekly in-class and homework exercises will help students develop their craft, and a series of in-depth workshops in the latter half of the course will allow students to apply critical reading skills to their own writing.  Aside from receiving one formal workshop for a longer piece, students will have the opportunity to submit short work for review every other week.

Since this course is designed for more experienced writers, previous enrollment in WWLA’s Nonfiction I course is suggested but not required.

This course will take place in Downtown L.A., where wine and sparkling water—and the occasional gourmet cheese—will be served.

Enrollment limit: 8 students
Course fee: $380 for new students; $340 for returning students (Payment plans available to returning students)

If you’re interested in signing up, please email writingworkshopsla@gmail.com

***

FICTION

Writing Sex: 2-Day Seminar (taught by Edan Lepucki in the Fairfax District)

Saturday and Sunday, 10 am to 1 pm
October 19, 2013 and October 20, 2013

SOLD OUT!

What makes a successful sex scene? This two-day seminar will address this question in depth, gleaning lessons from a diverse selection of published fiction.  Students will complete a series of exercises aimed at writing sex scenes that are nuanced, sensual, believable, and complex.  The seminar will also examine how such scenes in fiction can reveal and complicate character, theme and plot, and there will be a broader conversation about powerful scene writing in general.  On both days there will be opportunities to share and critique work in a respectful and comfortable environment.

This seminar will take place in the Fairfax District where coffee, sparkling water and light snacks will be served.

Enrollment limit: 8 students
$150 for new students; $130 for returning students

If you’re interested in signing up, please email writingworkshopsla@gmail.com

***

Craft and Structure: 2-Day Seminar (taught by Adam Cushman in Beachwood Canyon)

2 Sundays, 2 to 5 pm
October 20, 2013 and October 27, 2013

5 SPOTS LEFT!

This 2-day seminar will cover the elementals of craft and structure in fiction writing. From Aristotle’s Poetics and Monomyth, to syntax and style, this seminar will offer students a chance to hone their craft, arm themselves with new techniques, and be cured of bad writing habits.  The second meeting will be devoted to a rigorous and open-minded workshop of student writing.

This seminar will take place in Beachwood Canyon, where coffee, sparkling water and light snacks will be served.

Enrollment limit: 8 students
$150 for new students; $130 for returning students

If you’re interested in signing up, please email writingworkshopsla@gmail.com

***

The Novel from Beginning to End: 2-Day Seminar (taught by Ivy Pochoda in Downtown L.A.)

2 Sundays, 4 to 7 pm
October 6, 2013 and October 20, 2013

6 SPOTS LEFT!

What is a novel and what is my novel? First-time novelists often struggle with explaining their work in their own words. And they often fail to see their novels-in-progress as projects that will one day be complete! This two-day course will help beginning novelists categorize, explain, and outline their novels. We will look at different novel structures, various methods of outlining, and the best way to present ideas on the page. We will break students’ novels down into their component parts and trace character, story, and potential plot development from beginning to end. This course is open to anyone with a novel-in-progress regardless of the stage. Students will be asked to bring in a novel they find comparable to their own work, which they will present to the class. The second meeting will be dedicated to troubleshooting and deepening students’ outlines as well as writing successful pitch letters to agents.

This seminar will take place in downtown L.A., where wine, sparkling water and light snacks will be served.

Enrollment limit: 8 students
$150 for new students; $130 for returning students

If you’re interested in signing up, please email writingworkshopsla@gmail.com

***

Fiction I (taught by Seth Fischer in Echo Park)

Thursdays, 7:30 to 9:30 pm
September 26, 2013 to November 21, 2013 (no class 10/31)

SOLD OUT!

This 8-week course will introduce beginning writers to the basic techniques of fiction writing such as characterization, dramatization, dialogue, point of view, and so on. In class, students will discuss published fiction from a craft perspective and do writing exercises designed to tackle particular techniques. Each week students will have short writing assignments to do outside of class, which will be turned in for feedback from the instructor. As this course is designed for beginning writers, there won’t be any formal workshopping. The class is also open to more experienced writers who simply want to brush up on the basics.

This class will take place in Echo Park, where wine and sparkling water—and the occasional gourmet cheese—will be served.

Enrollment limit: 8 students per section
$380 for new students; $340 for returning students. (Payment plans available to returning students)

If you’re interested in signing up, please email writingworkshopsla@gmail.com

***

Fiction II (taught by Margaret Wappler in Silverlake)

Wednesdays, 7:30 to 9:30 pm
September 25, 2013 to November 20, 2013  (no class 10/16)

SOLD OUT!

This 8-week intermediate-level class is designed for both short story writers and novelists. For the first four weeks, students will do in-class writing exercises and discuss published short fiction and novel excerpts from a craft perspective. The class will cover such topics as characterization, pacing, point of view, structure, voice, and scene, and there will be short take-home writing assignments designed to help students progress with their manuscripts. For the final four weeks of the course, students will be workshopped in a serious environment meant to challenge and inspire every member of the class. Each student will have the opportunity to workshop either one short story manuscript or one novel excerpt (maximum 25 pages).

This course will take place in Silverlake, where wine and sparkling water—and the occasional gourmet cheese—will be served.

Enrollment limit: 8 students
$380 for new students; $340 for returning students. (Payment plans available to returning students)

If you’re interested in signing up, please email writingworkshopsla@gmail.com

***

Fiction III (taught by Adam Cushman in Beachwood Canyon)

Wednesdays, 7:30 to 9:30 pm
October 2, 2013 to December 11, 2013 (no class 11/27)

1 SPOT LEFT!

This 10-week course is designed for experienced students who are interested in deepening their understanding of fiction writing craft and technique.

For the first few weeks, the class will discuss published fiction and do in-class writing exercises. Students will be given optional out-of-class writing assignments, and there will be short critiques of students’ work-in-progress and revisions. Each student will write two pieces of fiction (short stories or novel excerpts); one of those manuscripts will be workshopped by the class, and the other will be given to the instructor for feedback.

This course will take place in Beachwood Canyon, where wine and sparkling water—and an occasional assortment of cheese and chocolates—will be served.

Enrollment limit: 8 students
$410 for new students; $380 for returning students. (Payment plans available to returning students)

If you’re interested in signing up, please email writingworkshopsla@gmail.com

***

Fiction IV (taught by Neelanjana Banerjee in Silverlake)

Tuesdays, 7:30 to 9:30 pm
October 1, 2013 to December 17, 2013 (no class 10/8 and 11/26)

SOLD OUT!

This 10-week course is designed for advanced writers with extensive workshop experience who are interested in deepening their understanding of fiction writing craft and technique. This course is by application only.

For the first few weeks, the class will discuss published fiction and do in-class writing exercises. Students will be given optional out-of-class writing assignments, and there will be short critiques of students’ work-in-progress and revisions. Each student will write two pieces of fiction (short stories or novel excerpts); one of those manuscripts will be workshopped by the class, and the other will be given to the instructor for feedback.

This course will take place in Silverlake, where wine and sparkling water—and the occasional gourmet cheese—will be served.

Enrollment limit: 8 students
$410 for new students; $380 for returning students. (Payment plans available to returning students only)

To apply for entry, please email writingworkshopsla@gmail.com

***

8-Week Fiction Writing Group

Section 1 (taught by Amelia Morris in Echo Park)
Tuesdays, 7:30 to 9:30 pm
October 1, 2013 to November 19, 2013

1 SPOT LEFT!

Section 2 (taught by Adam Cushman in Beachwood Canyon)
Mondays, 7:30 to 9:30 pm
September 30, 2013 to November 18, 2013

1 SPOT LEFT!

In this course, students will have the opportunity to be a part of a fiction writers’ group facilitated by a published writer. Within a supportive environment, students will share new and in-process work, write from prompts, take home ideas for new stories, talk about writing, and ask questions about craft, creation and process. We will form our own writing community, giving and receiving feedback from one another, all the while having a good time. This is not a lecture class, nor will there be class assignments.

Section 1 of this group will take in Echo Park, and section 2 will take place in Beachwood Canyon.  In both groups, wine, sparkling water, and the occasional snack, will be served.

Enrollment Limit: 8 students
Price: $250 for all students

If you’re interested in signing up, please email writingworkshopsla@gmail.com

***

Didn’t find what you’re looking for?  Writing Workshops Los Angeles also offers one-on-one instruction in fiction, nonfiction and poetry.  Email writingworkshopsla@gmail.com for more information.


Student News: Fall 2013

Posted: August 27th, 2013 | Author: | Filed under: Uncategorized | No Comments »
WWLA students are publishing, getting into writing conferences, doing readings, and having babies!  A big congratulations to all of them.
Elline Lipkin’s poetry students will read their work at Stories Books and Cafe in Echo Park on Tuesday, September 17 at 7:30pm. Hope to see you there!
Renee Carlino‘s self-published debut novel Sweet Thing reached USA Today’s Bestseller list.  Atria picked up the book for traditional distribution, as well as her next two books.
Claire Cronin was awarded a scholarship to attend the Squaw Valley Writer’s Conference.
Allison K. Gibson gave birth to Jude Rio Gibson on Sunday July 14th.
Anita Gill published a personal essay titled “Shadows in Rooms” in Eastlit.
Anthony Mohr‘s essay “26.9″ was included in the anthology California Prose Directory 2013: New Writing from the Golden State, published in May 2013.  LA Review highlighted Mohr’s essay on the glory and disappointments of 1960s surf culture in their favorable review of the collection. Mohr was also invited to participate in Dinty W. Moore’s literary nonfiction seminar at the Kenyon Review Writers Workshop in June 2013.
Shirin Najafi‘s “More than a Handful: A Review of David Dobkin’s The Boob Switch” was published by Trop in their recurring column of reviews of movies that don’t exist, called “Sleeper Celluloid.”
Joyce Salter, Darcy Vebber and Susan Wyler attended the Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference in Vermont this August.
Lisa Sanchez was awarded a scholarship to attended the Squaw Valley Writer’s Conference.
David Slavin‘s poems have been exciting editors all over the place! “The Swing” was published in the June edition of the literary journal Quill & ParchmentSwimming Lessons” was published in Quill & Parchment’s July issue. “Fragments” was featured in the latest issue of poetry mag Askew and David had two poems translated into Lithuanian by Sonata Paliulytė for Literatura Menas: “Stations of the Conic Sections” and “Cerberus.”
Christine Spines published the personal essay “Love Them and Leave Them” at Elle.

Instructor News: Fall 2013

Posted: August 27th, 2013 | Author: | Filed under: Uncategorized | No Comments »

Look what our instructors have been up to lately…

Neelanjana Banerjee‘s first play, Cowgirls, was given a staged reading at the David Henry Hwang Writers’ Institute New Works Festival on June 30th at the East West Players Theater in Little Tokyo.

Adam Cushman’s Kickstarter campaign for Red 14, the film company he co-founded in 2011, received full funding to produce literary shorts for four new or forthcoming books.  You can read an interview with Adam about this project here.

Chris Daley’s review of Queens of Noise: The Real Story of The Runaways was published in the Los Angeles Times Sunday Books section. Chris will also serve as a fiction moderator at the West Hollywood Book Fair on September 29. 

Edan Lepucki‘s story “Ambulance of Boys” was paired with art by Regina Mamou and music by Lady Lamb the Beekeeper in issue #71 of Storychord.  She also wrote about story arcs for her Ask the Writing Teacher column at The Millions.

Ivy Pochoda‘s novel Visitation Street was published on July 9 to a great review from the New York Times and a starred review from Publisher’s Weekly , amongst other fantastic mentions.


Coming Soon: Fall 2013 Class Schedule

Posted: August 14th, 2013 | Author: | Filed under: Uncategorized | No Comments »

Behind the scenes at WWLA, Edan and the instructors are putting together the list of Fall 2013 classes! They’re dotting their t’s and crossing their eyes… and in two weeks, the new class schedule will be available. Get excited!

If you want to subscribe to the mailing list, which only sends out notices of new classes, you can sign up by clicking here.


Student Work: Terrance Flynn’s PEN Emerging Voices Fellowship

Posted: July 12th, 2013 | Author: | Filed under: Uncategorized | No Comments »

Terrance Flynn, veteran of Chris Daley’s WWLA non-fiction classes, recently finished a prestigious PEN Emerging Voices Fellowship and will soon begin a residency at The MacDowell Colony.

While updating us on his whereabouts, Terrance gave us a taste of his “darkly comic” – and emotionally moving – style.  His answers to our catching-up questions turned into little personal essays in their own right.

Terrance will read with the rest of his PEN Fellows on Tuesday, July 16, at 7:00pm, at the Hammer Museum in Los Angeles.

 

How did you feel when you were selected as one of PEN’s Emerging Voices Fellows?

I was holding my friend’s new baby when I got the call, so I handed her off, then answered my phone and heard congratulations, but not much else. I tossed my friend’s baby very high in the air. It was a great moment.

What were your expectations for the program, and how did the master classes, readings, etc. either defy your expectations or fulfill them?

I should first mention I caught my friend’s baby.

The Emerging Voices Fellowship has been an ideal opportunity. Last summer when I applied, I was myself emerging from a kind of writing coma. I don’t mean that in a precious way; there is a medical component. I had been given a new heart two years previous, which pumped sufficient oxygen to my brain, as healthy hearts do. More on that later, but the point is, before my heart transplant I was mired in the mental sluggishness of the congestive heart failure caused by a virus that attacked my heart. Oxygen deprived people don’t have many interesting things to say, much less write. I know of no good parties held at the top of Mount Everest or at the bottom of the sea, and certainly not in the waiting rooms of heart failure clinics. But when people get back down to base camp or make it up to the ship—if they ever do—they regain their access to more provocative thought. Then it’s all, “I’m going to write a book,” and I was so hungry on that mountain I could have eaten you, etc.…

In my case, after I was lucky enough to get a new heart, My brain had enough oxygen to articulate my observations and quirks of the amazing and appalling time I spent tottering between life and death while watching the birth of my daughter. More on that later; the point is after transplant, I had a great story, and the refreshed urge to write. Still, readers don’t care if you can’t tap into something both universal and specific enough for them to keep reading. This is where the fellowship helped me so much. Chris Daley, PhD (WWLA nonfiction instructor) informed me about the EV application, and I worked very hard on the essay questions (a great writing exercise by the way). Chris also wrote a letter for me, and introduced me to Sacha Howells, a talented fiction writer and 2012 EV who also encouraged me to apply.

One of my favorite elements of EV is the mentorship. Libby Flores, the program manager for Emerging Voices (and The Mark program) does an amazing job hand picking a mentor for each fellow based on his or her project. She hooked me up with Mark Salzman, a Pulitzer Prize nominated Guggenheim fellow, a writer of five memoirs and two novels, and (not for nothing), a former model for Dewars Scotch who also happens to be one of the most humble, literate and articulate people I have met. Mark continues to challenge me to uncover the more subterranean themes of the memoir. Alienation and belonging. Not just in terms of sudden, chronic illness or the reproductive challenges of two gay men (my partner James and I), but more universally in terms of how each of our hearts is flawed and damaged by love and loss whether or not the physical pump has to be replaced.

I write about family. How its support sustains and smothers. The mentorship, and the fellowship in general have brought all these themes into sharper focus. Mark was also crucial in my receiving a residency for this fall at The MacDowell Colony. I’m telling you, if you have any inclination, apply for the EV fellowship. The community of LA writers into which it launches a new writer is so dynamic and welcoming.

What kind of tools did the program equip you with for going forward with your writing? Did you work on any specific projects while a fellow?

Some I’ve already mentioned, but each fellow has a current project. EVs are prodded to develop a logline. It’s a painful process, but one that has given us practice speaking with concision about our projects to agents, publishers, and published authors—people who, for the most part, have not written their own Wikipedia entrees. Just to name a few, we sat down with David Ulin, Jonathan Lethem, Aimee Bender, Bernard Cooper, Samantha Dunn, Emily Rapp, David Francis, poets James Ragan and Douglas Kearney, Jon Sands and many more. As accomplished as these professionals are, it was refreshing to hear them mention issues writers face at all stages in the game: developing a practice, facing rejection, day jobs, being inspired, and the pain in the ass of structure (as well as the freedom it provides). We sat down with these authors every Monday. Each time, I had the chance to clear my throat, look into their eyes and croak:

Dying to Meet You is a darkly comic memoir that relates the year I underwent a sudden heart transplant six months after watching my daughter’s birth. After waking up on Thanksgiving Day with a stranger’s heart, and a six month-old daughter to raise, I struggled to make sense of the complexity of gratitude.

My logline remains a work in progress, I know. But you get the idea.

So many of the elements of the EV fellowship have furthered my writing goals. I love the public readings. PEN does an amazing job promoting them, and while I am at it, the PEN staff is a group of fierce, dedicated people, many of them writers themselves.

What was your favorite part of taking Chris Daley’s WWLA class? Favorite assignments or aspects of her teaching style?

Talk about a fully perfused brain. Chris Daley, PhD (as I address her) has the ability to coax her students’ pieces from inception through revision to final draft, and then tell you exactly where you can submit them (though no one has to submit, as she reminds the class). Chris is able to verbalize details from a student’s writing that may be from three revisions earlier. I love how she has designed these one-page writing assignments that manage to be as encouraging as they are challenging. I have used them to start whole chapters in Dying To Meet You, a darkly comic memoir that relates the year I underwent a sudden heart transplant…Sorry. Habit. Anyway, I have been taking Chris’s class every session since I met her almost two years ago. I know for a fact that my fellow advanced nonfiction classmates consider Chris’s class, as I do, to be a driving force in the progress of their writing.

Oh, and I also love how Chris loves LA, particularly the vibrant literary culture of which she is an important part. She is a working writer and writing professor who moderates multiple panels at the LA Times Festival of Books; she is a judge for the 2014 LA Times Book Prize for Fiction and First Fiction categories, and she is the co-founder of WordCraft, a writing consulting collective in LA. Yet with all that going on, her written critiques of WWLA student’s work read like she has gone over them three or four times. She also has a great sense of humor, a great asset in teaching writer of creative nonfiction.

Are you excited for your reading at the Hammer?

Am I?!

Please come. Comfortable seats. Cool museum. Cash bar. Very proud to be reading alongside my fellow EVs, a talented bunch of writers of varied genre, reading from their current projects: Kima Jones (poetry collection), Tommy Moore (short story collection), Elle Brooks (memoir), Lilliam Rivera (YA fiction), and Krisserin Canary (fiction).


Summer 2013 Class Schedule

Posted: June 3rd, 2013 | Author: | Filed under: Uncategorized | No Comments »

SUMMER 2013 CLASS SCHEDULE

Please email writingworkshopsla@gmail.com if you’re interested in signing up for a class or seminar!

POETRY

Reading and Writing Poetry: 2-day Seminar (with Elline Lipkin in Altadena)

2 Saturdays, 10 am to 1 pm
July 20, 2013 and July 27, 2013

6 SPOTS LEFT!

This two-day mixed-levels seminar is designed to immerse students in the power and pleasure of poetry. Students will read and discuss a variety of published poems, and complete a series of in-class writing exercises. The seminar will explore different types of poetic forms and introduce students to major craft questions, such as how to work effectively with metaphor and how to use rhythm to enhance meaning. Techniques such as enjambment, line length, and use of white space on the page will be discussed as well. The second meeting will be devoted to formally workshopping poetry by students. This seminar is an opportunity for students to explore the art and craft of poetry at any level with the chance to experiment with words and feel inspired.

This seminar will take place in Altadena, where coffee and sparkling water will be served.

Enrollment limit: 8 students
$150 for new students; $130 for returning students

If you’re interested in signing up, please email writingworkshopsla@gmail.com

***

Poetry III (with Elline Lipkin in Beverly Grove)

Tuesdays, 7:30 to 9:30 pm
July 16, 2013 to September 10, 2013 (no class August 20, 2013)

2 SPOTS LEFT!

This 8-week advanced class is designed to bring experienced writing students even deeper into their practice of poetry. In each meeting, the class will focus on a different poetic device or technique, and students will read writers whose work exemplifies a poetry challenge students can then try themselves. Students will explore different types of poetic forms, read established poets’ work, and offer feedback on each other’s writing. This class is an opportunity for students to explore the art and craft of poetry at a more rigorous level, and to engage with fellow students in a serious workshop environment.

This course will take place in Beverly Grove where wine and sparkling water—and the occasional gourmet cheese—will be served.

Poetry III is by application only, and it’s recommended for students who have studied poetry for at least a year, and/or who have taken two or more poetry classes with Elline.

Enrollment limit: 8 students

$400 for new students; $360 for returning students (price includes a parking pass; payment plans available to returning students) To apply for entry, please email writingworkshopsla@gmail.com.

***

NONFICTION

Food Writing: 2-Day Seminar (taught by Amelia Morris by Echo Park)

2 Saturdays, 12 to 3 pm
August 3, 2013 and August 17, 2013

5 SPOTS LEFT!

Food writing takes many forms, from literary journalism to memoir to fiction to the personal essay to travel writing and more. In this class, students will read and analyze various examples of published food writing from these different genres, discussing what makes the piece successful. Students will also complete a number of writing exercises designed to bring their own eating and cooking experiences to life on the page.

For the first class meeting, students will arrive with a 3-page response assignment (to be assigned to you once you’ve registered for the course), which will be critiqued by the class. Two weeks later, for the second meeting, there will be a more formal workshop of student work based on a separate, much more open-ended writing assignment.

This seminar will be held in the instructor’s home in Echo Park. For sustenance and inspiration (and fun), small bites, prepared by the instructor, will be provided.

Enrollment Limit: 8 students.

Price: $150 for new students; $130 for returning students
If you’re interested in signing up, please email writingworkshopsla@gmail.com

***

Nonfiction I (taught by Chris Daley in Los Feliz)

Thursdays, 7:30 to 9:30 pm
July 25, 2013 to September 12, 2013

SOLD OUT!

In this 8-week course, students will read, discuss, and write essays (or chapters) that will explore the genre(s) of personal narrative and memoir. The readings will be selected to stimulate thinking, exemplify different techniques and styles, and suggest techniques for engaging personal and creative expression. There will be in-class and homework exercises that address topics such as persona, audience, story, description, memory and truth, and ethical considerations specific to the genre. Students will have the chance to workshop their writing in a serious environment meant to challenge and inspire each member of the class.

This course will take place in the instructor’s home in Los Feliz, where wine and sparkling water—and the occasional gourmet cheese—will be served.

Enrollment limit: 8 students

Course fee: $380 for new students; $340 for returning students (Payment plans available to returning students)
If you’re interested in signing up, please email writingworkshopsla@gmail.com

***

Nonfiction II (taught by Seth Fischer in Echo Park)

Wednesdays, 7:30 to 9:30 pm
July 10, 2013 to August 28, 2013

SOLD OUT!

This 8-week intermediate course is designed for writers who are looking to continue their exploration of the memoir or personal essay genre. The students will have some familiarity with at least a few of the generic concerns of personal narrative, such as hybridity of form, dramatization, retrospective versus immediate point of view, ethics, and so on. There will be some assigned readings, but the class will focus on bringing projects toward completion through a process of drafting, feedback, and revision in a challenging but supportive environment. Weekly in-class and homework exercises will help students develop their craft, and a series of in-depth workshops in the latter half of the course will allow students to apply critical reading skills to their own writing. Aside from receiving one formal workshop for a longer piece, students will have the opportunity to submit short work for review every other week.

Since this course is designed for more experienced writers, previous enrollment in WWLA’s Nonfiction I course is suggested but not required.

This course will take place in the instructor’s home in Echo Park, where wine and sparkling water—and the occasional gourmet cheese—will be served.

Enrollment limit: 8 students

Course fee: $380 for new students; $340 for returning students (Payment plans available to returning students)

If you’re interested in signing up, please email writingworkshopsla@gmail.com

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FICTION

Flash Fiction: 2-Day Seminar (taught by Margaret Wappler in Mt. Washington)

2 Saturdays, 12 to 3 pm
July 13, 2013 and July 20, 2013

6 SPOTS LEFT!

This two-day seminar will examine the rewards and challenges of this tricky form. Students will read and analyze compelling examples of published flash fiction, and they will also complete a number of in-class exercises designed to investigate the genre further. Topics such as precision, narrative propulsion, description and voice will be discussed. The second class will be devoted to the formal workshopping of student writing.

Enrollment limit: 8 students

$150 for new students; $130 for returning students
If you’re interested in signing up, please email writingworkshopsla@gmail.com

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Structure: 2-Day Seminar (taught by Adam Cushman in Beachwood Canyon)

2 Sundays, 2 to 5 pm
July 14, 2013 and July 21, 2013

2 SPOTS LEFT!

In this two-day seminar, students will learn an assortment of story structure techniques. We’ll discuss Aristotelian structure, monomyth and archetypes, allegory, and more. We’ll also look at the differences between story structure and character structure and how all of these story elements can help bring out emotion, make revision easier, and most importantly, prevent students from getting stuck or suffering from that myth called “writer’s block.” We will spend the second session workshopping student writing assignments, using the stories as a vehicle to discuss the structure and craft we covered in the first session.

Enrollment limit: 8 students

$150 for new students; $130 for returning students
If you’re interested in signing up, please email writingworkshopsla@gmail.com

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Fiction I (taught by Margaret Wappler in Mt. Washington)  

Wednesdays, 7:30 to 9:30 pm
July 3, 2013 to August 21, 2013

SOLD OUT!

This 8-week course will introduce beginning writers to the basic techniques of fiction writing such as characterization, dramatization, dialogue, point of view, and so on. In class, students will discuss published fiction from a craft perspective and do writing exercises designed to tackle particular techniques. Each week students will have short writing assignments to do outside of class, which will be turned in for feedback from the instructor. As this course is designed for beginning writers, there won’t be any formal workshopping. The class is also open to more experienced writers who simply want to brush up on the basics.

This course will take place in the instructor’s home in Mt. Washington. Refreshments—and the occasional snack—will be served.

Enrollment limit: 8 students per section

$380 for new students; $340 for returning students. (Payment plans available to returning students)
If you’re interested in signing up, please email writingworkshopsla@gmail.com

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Fiction II (taught by Adam Cushman in Beachwood Canyon)

Wednesdays, 7:30 to 9:30 pm
July 10, 2013 to August 28, 2013

SOLD OUT!

This 8-week intermediate-level class is designed for both short story writers and novelists. For the first four weeks, students will do in-class writing exercises and discuss published short fiction and novel excerpts from a craft perspective. The class will cover such topics as characterization, pacing, point of view, structure, voice, and scene, and there will be short take-home writing assignments designed to help students progress with their manuscripts. For the final four weeks of the course, students will be workshopped in a serious environment meant to challenge and inspire every member of the class. Each student will have the opportunity to workshop either one short story manuscript or one novel excerpt (maximum 25 pages).

This course will take place in Beachwood Canyon, where wine and sparkling water—and the occasional gourmet cheese—will be served.

Enrollment limit: 8 students

$380 for new students; $340 for returning students. (Payment plans available to returning students)
If you’re interested in signing up, please email writingworkshopsla@gmail.com

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Fiction III (taught by Neelanjana Banerjee in Silverlake)

Tuesdays, 7:30 to 9:30 pm
July 16, 2013 to September 17, 2013

SOLD OUT!

This 10-week course is designed for experienced students who are interested in deepening their understanding of fiction writing craft and technique.

For the first few weeks, the class will discuss published fiction and do in-class writing exercises. Students will be given optional out-of-class writing assignments, and there will be short critiques of students’ work-in-progress and revisions. Each student will write two pieces of fiction (short stories or novel excerpts); one of those manuscripts will be workshopped by the class, and the other will be given to the instructor for feedback.

This course will take place in the instructor’s home in Silverlake, where wine and sparkling water—and an occasional assortment of cheese and chocolates—will be served.

Enrollment limit: 8 students

$410 for new students; $380 for returning students. (Payment plans available to returning students)
If you’re interested in signing up, please email writingworkshopsla@gmail.com

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8-Week Fiction Writing Group (taught by Amelia Morris in Echo Park)

Tuesdays, 7:30 to 9:30 pm
July 9, 2013 to September 3, 2013 (no class 7/23)

SOLD OUT!

In this course, students will have the opportunity to be a part of a fiction writers’ group facilitated by a published writer. Within a supportive environment, students will share new and in-process work, write from prompts, take home ideas for new stories, talk about writing, and ask questions about craft, creation and process. We will form our own writing community, giving and receiving feedback from one another, all the while having a good time. This is not a lecture class, nor will there be class assignments.

This course will take place in the instructor’s home in Echo Park, where wine, sparkling water, and the occasional snack, will be served.

Enrollment Limit: 8 students

Price: $250 for all students
If you’re interested in signing up, please email writingworkshopsla@gmail.com

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Didn’t find what you’re looking for? Writing Workshops Los Angeles also offers one-on-one instruction in fiction, nonfiction and poetry. Email writingworkshopsla@gmail.com for more information.


Instructor News

Posted: May 21st, 2013 | Author: | Filed under: Uncategorized | No Comments »

Look what our instructors have been up to lately…

Neelanjana Banerjee received a scholarship to attend the Community of Writers at Squaw Valley this summer.

Adam Cushman‘s first novel Cut will be released by Black Mountain Press in December 2013.  He is also now editing a weekly column of fake movie reviews called “Sleeper Celluoid”  on www.tropmag.com.

Chris Daley will serve as a judge for the Fiction and First Fiction Awards of the 2014 Los Angeles Times Book Prizes. She also moderated two panels at the Los Angeles Times Festival of Books in April.

Seth Fischer’s essay “Notes from a Unicorn” will be listed as a notable essay in The Best American Essays 2013. He has also been named a contributor to BuzzFeed LGBT.

Edan Lepucki‘s short story “Coffee Bar” was published in the latest issue of NANO Fiction.

Elline Lipkin‘s essay “Phil Levine at Houston: My First Teacher,” about studying with Philip Levine when she was a grad student, was included in the recently released collection Coming Close: Forty Essays on Philip Levine.

Publisher’s Weekly picked Ivy Pochoda‘s upcoming novel Visitation Street as a Best Summer Read for 2013.

Shannan Rouss has a forthcoming children’s book, A Watermelon in the Sukkah, which she co-wrote with her mom (awwwww!). Pre-order it here.

Margaret Wappler was included in the anthology Yes is the Answer (And Other Prog-Rock Tales), edited by Marc Weingarten and Tyson Cornell, alongside works by Rick Moody, Joe Meno and Seth Greenland.


Student News

Posted: May 21st, 2013 | Author: | Filed under: Uncategorized | No Comments »
WWLA students are publishing, getting into grad school and writing conferences, performing, teaching, and having babies!  A big congratulations to all of them.

Spring 2013 creative nonfiction students Jen Berkowitz, Marie Condron, L. Marie Cook, Andrea Dandino, Heather Fowler, Louisa Levine, Jennifer McCharen, and Amanda McRaven will be reading at a June event in Los Feliz.

Renee Carlino‘s debut novel Sweet Thing has hit the shelves and is available for purchase at your local independent bookstore (Vroman’s or Skylight or Book Soup, oh my!) or online here.

Melissa Chadburn is a guest lecturer at UC San Diego, teaching Short Fiction, Personal Narrative and Creative Nonfiction. This summer she will attend the Graduate Summer Workshop at the University of Iowa Writers’ Workshop.

Jon Doyle‘s first novel, The Awareness, co-written with Gene Stone, will be released this August by NetMinds, under their NetMinds Select imprint.

Elisabeth Adwin Edwards will be attending the Napa Valley Writer’s Conference this summer, studying with poet Major Jackson.

Terrance Flynn was a finalist in this year’s Annual New South Writing Contest. His last reading as a PEN Emerging Voices Fellow will take place at the Hammer Museum on July 16.

Kristy Lloyd received a scholarship to the Martha’s Vineyard Institute for Creative Writing for the summer 2013 week-long writing seminar.

Sanam Mahloudji gave birth to twins Dahlia Anise Mahloudji Krug and Juliette Saffron Mahloudji Krug on April 1, 2013 at 6:03 and 6:10 am.

Josh Mak has been accepted to the MFA program at the University of Oregon.

Joyce Salter was accepted to this summer’s Squaw Valley Writers Workshop for creative nonfiction.